Division of Mathematics and Sciences

Division of Mathematics and Sciences

Mathematics and Sciences Faculty

Maria Agapito 
Assistant Professor and Program Chair of Biology
BS, MS, Montclair State University; PhD, Rutgers University

Kate Beridze
Assistant Professor of Mathematics
MS, Tbilisi State University, Georgia; PhD, Georgian Academy of Sciences

Marc B. Berman
Assistant Professor of Physics
BS, University of Maryland; MA, Hunter College; PhD, The Graduate Center, City University of
New York

Jenna Chirico
Assistant Professor of Chemistry
BS, Washington College; MAT, Montclair State University

Benjamin Griffel
Assistant Professor of Mathematics and Biology
BS, Rutgers University; MS, Drexel School of Biomedical Engineering; PhD, Rutgers University and University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences

Ashley Iguina
Assistant Professor of Physics
BA, Wellesley College; MAT, Montclair State University

Karla Ko
Assistant Professor of Mathematics
BA, MAT, William Paterson University

Tiffany R. Morris
Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Program Chair of Physics
BS, MS, New Jersey Institute of Technology; PhD, Rutgers University and University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences

Lance D. Silverman
Assistant Professor of Chemistry
BS, New York University; PhD, Polytechnic Institute of New York University; Postdoctoral Research Associate, Columbia University

Victoria Siroy
Assistant Professor of Mathematics

Mathematics and Sciences Courses

High School Mathematics Courses

BARD 017  Mathematics 9: Algebra I 

BARD 018  Mathematics 9: Algebra I

In semester 1 of this 2-semester math course, students will learn to: 1) Create linear equations & inequalities & systems of these to represent relationships between quantities and 2) Construct and interpret in problem context multiple representations of linear relationships (graphs, visuals, tables, equations). The focus for semester 2 is 1) quadratic functions and non-linear graphs, and 2) adding/subtracting/factoring polynomials.

BARD 019  Mathematics 10: Geometry 

BARD 020  Mathematics 10: Geometry

Geometry is the study of size and shape of physical objects. Concepts from Algebra 1 will be used to explore the relationships between, angles, shapes, the coordinate plane. Students will also be introduced to formal logic for the purpose of proving theorems and arguments, as well the use of physical tools to measure and create constructions for proving geometric theorems. Topics taught will include similarity and congruence, trigonometry, transformation, geometric proofs, measurements of geometric shapes, and theorems relating angles in various configurations and shapes.

College Mathematics Courses

BARD021/MATH109N College Algebra 

College algebra enables students to polish their algebra skills in order to study more advanced math; the course also serves students who intend to focus on areas outside of mathematics and the sciences in their college studies.  The algebraic tools studied includes those required for pre-calculus and calculus, as well as for the study of probability, statistics, computer science, and other quantitative fields.  Students learn about graphs, polynomials, rational functions, exponential functions and logarithmic functions.

BARD022/MATH110N Pre-Calculus 

This course focuses on the study of the function concept and the major function classes. Among the classes that will be considered are the polynomial functions, the rational functions, the exponential and logarithmic functions, and the trigonometric functions and their inverses. This course is recommended for anyone who is seriously considering continuing on in mathematics or in the sciences in their college careers.

BARD023/MATH141N Calculus I

BARD024/MATH142N Calculus II

This two-semester sequence focuses on the major elements of calculus.  The first semester centers on functions, graphs, and limits.  The concept of the derivative is also central to the course, including the derivative at a point, and the derivative as a function.  The second semester includes interpretation and properties of definite integrals, the fundamental theorem of calculus, and applications of antidifferentiation.

BARD028/MATH101N  College Topics in Mathematics II

This course will contain two portions: the first third of our time will focus on rudimentary but mathematically vital concepts of functions, patterns, and number operations. The last two thirds will be a less encumbered exploration of applications of math in everyday life and a conceptual exploration of calculus. Throughout, the course will emphasize life-long mathematical skills: an ability to use math to model and solve real-world problems, construct viable arguments & critique the reasoning of others, and persevere in solving challenging problems.

High School Science Courses

BARD029  Introduction to Science

This course provides a solid conceptual foundation for physical and life sciences through problem solving, demonstrations, and hands-on laboratory work.  Students learn to understand the role of empirical data in establishing scientific knowledge and develop skills through experimental design.  In addition to empirical evidence, science involves skepticism and rational arguments: students demonstrate the critical thinking, skepticism and logical deduction inherent in the practice of the science.  Students also investigate several paradigm examples of the fundamental conceptual models in science which underlie our current understanding of the natural world.

BARD032  Physics

This one-semester course presents an introduction to physics. While this course will focus on a conceptual understanding of the material, students will also be expected to analyze ideas within a mathematical framework consistent with the skills developed in their current math class. Critical thinking will be fostered throughout the course through the application of the scientific method. Topics discussed this semester will include motion and kinematics, forces and dynamics, gravitation, energy, momentum and theory of relativity. The significant laboratory portion of this course will provide complementary exposure to the concepts discussed in class.

BARD030  Biology

This one-semester course presents an introduction to biology.  Students explore the nature of life at molecular, cellular, and organismal levels.  While this course focuses on biological concepts, an understanding of the chemical reactions underlying cellular function will also be developed.  Students also explore organisms within the broader contexts of ecology and the environment. The significant laboratory portion of this course will provide complementary exposure to the concepts discussed in class.

BARD031  Chemistry

BARD031  Chemistry

This two-semester course presents an introduction to chemistry.  Topics include atomic structure, molecular structure, and properties of molecules.  Fundamental principles such as kinetics, equilibrium, and thermodynamics will be introduced to describe many chemical reactions.  Throughout the course, a heavy emphasis is placed on group and individual problem solving, and on laboratory-based investigations of important phenomena.  The significant laboratory portion of this course will provide complementary exposure to the concepts discussed in class.

College Science Courses

BARD033/BIO101N Biology I

BARD034/BIO102N Biology II

This two-semester sequence investigates the fundamentals of living systems. Through lectures and laboratory investigations we will explore the structure and function of the cell and the biological macromolecules that build it up and investigate biological systems of two Kingdoms of life: plants and animals. In the first semester, we will also look at key chemical reactions that keep the cell alive and help it carry out its duties, and we will study how single cells function together to build up multicellular organisms as complex as humans. In the second semester, students examine the anatomy and physiology of major plant and animal groups, paying particular attention to mechanisms of reproduction, growth and development. Students become familiar with methods of taxonomy and phylogenetic analysis and engage fundamental principles of evolution including mechanisms of genetic variation and inheritance, population dynamics, extinction and the origin of species.

BARD035/CHEM141N Chemistry I

BARD036/CHEM142N Chemistry II

This two-semester sequence introduces students to the general principles of chemistry.  The courses are designed to provide a solid base in general chemistry as well as to demonstrate applications in related fields. The classes and discussions are intended to provide students with the basic principles and theories of general chemistry. Concurrently, the laboratory, multiple sessions in length, will develop the practical aspects of chemistry by introducing fundamental laboratory techniques and emphasizing the core chemical principles studied in class.

BARD037/PHYS141N Physics I

BARD038/PHYS142N Physics II

This two-semester sequence introduces the general principles of physics, presenting both a historical perspective and modern applications of these principles. Both concepts and problem solving are emphasized and the importance of experimental physics is demonstrated in the laboratory. The fall semester focuses on mechanisms; the spring semester focuses on electricity and magnetism. Topics include linear and rotational motion, Newton’s laws of motion, conservation of energy, momentum, thermodynamics, harmonic motion, wave motion, light, sound, electricity, magnetism, and an introduction to modern physics. Selected topics are studied via multiple session laboratory experiments.

BARD039  Pre-­Medical Pathology II 

Overview of human body functions, including an intro to anatomy and physiology topics, medical cases, and modern medical advances. This course aims at studying the essential wellness practices as they relate to current concepts of preventive medicine; investigates the latest scientific findings relevant to the major diseases and causes of premature death in the U.S.  Topics include: Cell Adaptation, Neoplasia I, II, III, Biological Aging, Inflammation, Cell Injury and Repair. This class is the part two to Pre-Medical Pathology I. The basic concepts of biology are needed for this course. HS Biology (or College General Biology I) is the prerequisite to this class.

BARD039       College Health Sciences 

This course presents an introduction to key topics in health sciences, suitable both for students considering medical professions and for those who just want to better manage their own health.  Overview of human body functions, including an introduction to anatomy and physiology topics, medical cases, and modern medical advances. This course aims at studying the essential wellness practices as they relate to current concepts of preventive medicine; investigates the latest scientific findings relevant to the major diseases and causes of premature death in the U.S.